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Private and Public Lies: The Discourse of Despotism and Deceit in the Graeco-Roman World (Andrew J Turner James H. Kim On Chong-Gossard, (eds)) Hardcover Book, (Brill, 2010) 9789004187757
Private and Public Lies: The Discourse of Despotism and Deceit in the Graeco-Roman World (Andrew J Turner James H. Kim On Chong-Gossard, (eds)) Hardcover Book, (Brill, 2010) 9789004187757
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Title: Private and Public Lies: The Discourse of Despotism and Deceit in the Graeco-Roman World

Author: Turner, Andrew J James H. Kim On Chong-Gossard, (eds)

Publisher: Brill; Publication Date: 2010

Hardcover; ISBN: 9789004187757

Volumes: 1; Pages: xx, 440

List Price in Cloth: $200.00 Our price: $169.99

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Graeco-Roman literary works, historiography, and even the reporting of rumours were couched as if they came in response to an insatiable desire by ordinary citizens to know everything about the lives of their leaders, and to hold them to account, at some level, for their abuse of constitutional powers for personal ends. Ancient writers were equally fascinated with how these same individuals used deceit as a powerful tool to disguise private and public reality. The chapters in this collection examine the themes of despotism and deceit from both historical and literary perspectives, over a range of historical periods including classical Athens, the Hellenistic kingdoms, late republican and early imperial Rome, late antiquity, and Byzantium. Table of contentsPrefaceIntroductionAbbreviationsList of ContributorsI. The Graeco-Hellenistic World1. Jonathan Hall, Autochthonous Autocrats: The tyranny of the Athenian democracy2. Peter Londey, Phokian Desperation: Private and public in the outbreak of the 3rd Sacred War3. Brian Bosworth, Truth and falsehood in early Hellenistic propaganda4. Jonathan Prag, Tyrannizing Sicily: The despots who cried "Carthage"II. Republican Rome5. Francisco Pina Polo, Frigidus rumor: The creation of a (negative) public image in Rome6. Christopher Dart, Deceit and the struggle for Roman franchise in Italy7. Fr�d�ric Hurlet, Pouvoirs extraordinaires et tromperie. La tentation de la monarchie � la fin de la R�publique romaine (82-44 av. J.-C.)III. Augustan dissimulation8. Frederik Vervaet, Arrogating despotic power through deceit: the Pompeian model for Augustan dissimulatio9. John Rich, Deception, lies, and economy with the truth: Augustus and the establishment of the principateIV. Early imperial literature10. Andrew Turner, Lucan's Cleopatra11. John Penwill, Damn with great praise? The imperial encomia of Lucan and Silius12. Enrica Sciarrino, What "lies" behind Phaedrus? fables?13. Parshia Lee-Stecum, Mendacia maiorum: tales of deceit in pre-Republican Rome14. Cristina Calhoon, Is there an antidote to Caesar? The despot as uenenum and ueneficus15. K. O. Chong-Gossard, Who slept with whom in the Roman empire? Women, sex, and scandal in Suetonius' Lives of the CaesarsV. The later empire16. Martijn Icks, From priest to emperor to priest-emperor: The failed legitimation of Elagabalus17. Bruno Bleckmann, Constantinus tyrannus: Das negative Konstantinsbild in der paganen Historiographie und seine Nuancen18. Amelia Brown, Justinian, Procopius, and deception: Literary lies, imperial politics, and the archaeology of sixth-century GreeceVI. The broader context19. Ron Ridley, Despotism and Deceit: Yes, but what happened before and after?BibliographyIndex
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