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Roman Historiography: An Introduction to its Basic Aspects and Development (Andreas Mehl) Hardcover Book, (Wiley-Blackwell, 2011) 9781405121835
Roman Historiography: An Introduction to its Basic Aspects and Development (Andreas Mehl) Hardcover Book, (Wiley-Blackwell, 2011) 9781405121835
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Title: Roman Historiography: An Introduction to its Basic Aspects and Development

Author: Mehl, Andreas

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell; Publication Date: 2011

Hardcover; ISBN: 9781405121835

Volumes: 1; Pages: 304

List Price in Cloth: $124.95 Our price: $115.99

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Roman Historiography: An Introduction to its Basic Aspects and Development presents a comprehensive introduction to the development of Roman historical writings in both Greek and Latin, from the early annalists to Orosius and Procopius of Byzantium.* Provides an accessible survey of every historical writer of significance in the Roman world* Traces the growth of Christian historiography under the influence of its pagan adversaries* Offers valuable insight into current scholarly trends on Roman historiography* Includes a user-friendly bibliography, catalog of authors and editions, and indexContentsTranslator?s Preface.Introduction: The Importance of Ancient Historiography and the Purpose of this Book.Chapter 1: Ancient Literature and Roman Historiography.1.1 Roman Literature and its Relation to Greek Literature.1.2 Roman Historiography and the City of Rome.1.3 The Claims of Artistry and Truth in Ancient, especially Roman, Historiography.1.3.1 Literary Artistry and Moral Preoccupations in Ancient Historiography.1.3.2 "History is what Actually Happened" -- Ancient Historiography and the Modern Science of History.Chapter 2: The Formation and Establishment of Tradition in the Ruling Class of the Early and Middle Roman Republic.2.1 Family Histories and Clan Traditions.2.2 The Annales Maximi and the Almanacs of Publius Mucius Scaevola.Chapter 3: Early Roman Historiography: Self-Justification and Memory in earlier Annalistic Writing.3.1 Early Annalistic Writing (I).3.1.1 Quintus Fabius Pictor.3.1.2 Later Authors (From Cincius Alimentus to Postumius Albinus).3.2 Early Annalistic Writing (II).3.2.1 Marcus Porcius Cato.3.2.2 Other Authors (from Cassius Hemina to Sempronius Asellio).3.3 Early Historical Epic in Rome (Naevius and Ennius).Chapter 4: The Historiography of Rome between the Fronts of the Civil Wars.4.1 Later Annalistic Writing: Optimates vs. Populares and Traditional Annalistic Writing vs. Contemporary History.4.2 Autobiographies, Memoirs, Hypomnemata, Commentarii, and their Influence on the Historiography of Current Events.4.2.1 Self-Representations until Cicero.4.2.2 Caesar's Commentarii.4.3 The History of Current Events to Order and Contemporary Concepts of Historiography (Cicero).4.4 Biography (Cornelius Nepos).4.5 The Experience of the Collapsing and Ruined Republic.4.5.1 Gaius Sallustius Crispus.4.5.2 Gaius Asinius Pollio.4.6 Antiquarian Writings.Chapter 5: Augustan Rome, Roman Empire, and other Peoples and Kingdoms.5.1 Titus Livius: Roman History from Romulus to Augustus in its Entirety.5.2 World History, the History of the World beyond Rome, and Roman History by Non-Romans and New Romans.5.2.1 World History and Roman History (from Diodorus to Juba).5.2.2 Dionysius of Halicarnassus: Early Rome and the Greeks.5.2.3 Pompeius Trogus: World History round about Rome.5.2.4 Universal Chronology (Castor and Dionysius).Chapter 6: Imperial History and the History of Emperors -- Imperial History as the History of Emperors.6.1 Empire and "Republic": Senatorial Historiography.6.1.1 Gaius (?) Velleius Paterculus.6.1.2 Authors of the Julio-Claudian and Flavian Period (from Cremutius Cordus to Pliny the Younger).6.1.3 Publius (?) Cornelius Tacitus.6.1.4 Lucius Cl(audius) Cassius Dio Cocceianus.6.2 Rome and Foreign Peoples.6.2.1 Josephus / Flavius Josephus: Jews and Others.6.2.2 Appian of Alexandria: A Retrospective View of the Establishment of Rome's World Domination.6.3 Imperial History as Imperial Biography.6.3.1 Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus.6.3.2 Marius Maximus and Herodian.6.3.3 Historia Augusta / Scriptores Historiae Augustae.6.4 Personal History and Biography in the High Empire beyond Roman Emperors.6.4.1 Curtius Rufus and Arrian of Nicomedia: Histories of Alexander.6.4.2 Plutarch of Chaeronea: Parallel Lives.6.5 History in "Pocket-Size".6.5.1 From the Epitome of Livy, the Epitome of Trogus, and Florus to Lucius Ampelius.6.5.2 The Historical Epitomes of the Fourth Century A.D. (Aurelius Victor, Eutropius, Festus).6.6 Exempla-Literature and Historical Understanding.Chapter 7: Roman History and Universal History between Classical Religion ("Paganism") and Christianity.7.1 Zosimus and his Predecessors: Classically Religious Historiography and Historical Interpretation in a Christian Age.7.2 Ammianus Marcellinus: Indifferent to Religion?7.3 Christian Historiography.7.3.1 Church History (Eusebius and Rufinus).7.3.2 From Classically Religious Chronography to Christian Universal Chronicle (Eusebius, Jerome, Sulpicius).7.3.3 Orosius: Universal History through the Lens of Theology.7.3.4 Procopius of Caesarea: The History of Current Events in Transition from Rome to Byzantium.Chapter 8: Some Basic Principles of Ancient Historical Thought.Chronological Table.Select Bibliography1. General Bibliography.1.1 Editions, Translations, and Commentaries for the Historiographical and Biographical Works Treated in this Book.1.2 Editions of Historiographical Works and Historical Epics in Greek and Latin that Survive only in Fragments.1.3 Histories of Greek and Latin Literature, especially Historiography: Recent Surveys and Collections.1.4 Ancient Historiography, especially Roman: its Basic Literary, Social, and Intellectual Contexts.2. The Formation and Establishment of Tradition in the Ruling Class of the Early and Middle Roman Republic.3. Early Roman Historiography: Self-Justification and Memory in Early Annalistic Writing.4. The Historiography of Rome between the Fronts of the Civil Wars.5. Augustan Rome, Roman Empire, and other Peoples and Kingdoms.6. Imperial History and the History of Emperors -- Imperial History as the History of Emperors.7. Roman History and Universal History between Classical Religion ("Paganism") and Christianity.Index.
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