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Bound Choice, Election and Wittenberg Theological Method: From Martin Luther to the Formula of Concord (Robert Kolb) Paperback Book, (Wm B Eerdmans Publishing Co, 2005) 9780802829221
Bound Choice, Election and Wittenberg Theological Method: From Martin Luther to the Formula of Concord (Robert Kolb) Paperback Book, (Wm B Eerdmans Publishing Co, 2005) 9780802829221
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Title: Bound Choice, Election and Wittenberg Theological Method: From Martin Luther to the Formula of Concord

Author: Kolb, Robert

Publisher: Wm B Eerdmans Publishing Co; Publication Date: 2005

Paperback; ISBN: 9780802829221

Volumes: 1; Pages: 393

List Price in Paper: $35.00 Our price: $23.99

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Responding to Erasmus's teaching on free will in one of the most famous exchanges of Western intellectual history, Martin Luther authored De servo arbitrio, or The Bondage of the Will, which insisted that the sinful human will could not turn itself to God in any way. In this first study to investigate the reception of De servo, Reformation scholar Robert Kolb unpacks the theology of Luther's treatise and of Melanchthon's critical response to it. He then recounts the ensuing disputes among Luther's students over the freedom of the will and election until their resolution in the Lutheran churches' 1577 "Formula of Concord." In the process, Kolb demonstrates how the method of practicing theology that Luther and Melanchthon developed at Wittenberg shaped the content of the Reformation's message.ContentsBibliographical AbbreviationsAcknowledgmentsIntroduction: "One of the Most Famous Exchanges in Western Intellectual History"Content and Method in Wittenberg TheologyThe Reception of De servo arbitrio as a Theological Issue1. "None of My Works Is Worth Anything, Except Perhaps De servo arbitrio ...": Luther and the Bondage of Human ChoiceErasmus and Luther: A Feud Waiting to HappenThe Nature of De servo arbitrioThe Roots of Luther's View of ChoiceThe Theology of De servo arbitrioLet God Be GodGod Hidden and RevealedGod Chooses His OwnGod Saves through the Means of GraceHuman Beings Are Dependent CreaturesAll Things Happen by NecessityHuman Beings Are SinnersHuman Creatures Are Totally Responsible AgentsBelievers Live a Life of RepentanceGod Is Not Responsible for Evil2. Drawing the Spirits in His Path: De servo arbitrio Wins a (Critical) FollowingThe Lutheran Humanists and the Bound WillPulverizing Free Choice and Seeking a Balance (or Dynamic Tension): Melanchthon on the Freedom of the WillHumanist and ReformerThe Loci communes of 1521The Commentary on ColossiansThe Development of Melanchthon's Thought, 1530-1559Melanchthon's Views in Official Statements of FaithMelanchthon's Views in the Revisions of His Loci communesPredestinationContingency and NecessityFreedom of the WillReactions to Melanchthon's Teaching in the 1530s and 1540s (or the Curious Lack Thereof)Melanchthon's Last Word on the Freedom of the Will3. Luther's and Melanchthon's Students Debate the Doctrine of the Freedom of the WillThe Outbreak of Controversy: The Struggle to Define Wittenberg TheologyThe Synergistic ControversyThe Origins of the ControversyMelanchthon versus GallusFlacius versus StrigelThe Public Polemic ContinuesThe Altenburg Colloquy4. Luther's Students Use De servo arbitrio in Teaching on the Freedom of the WillThe Use of De servo arbitrio apart from the Synergistic ControversyThe Synergistic Controversy as Setting for the Use of De servo arbitrioLet God Be GodGod Hidden and RevealedGod Chooses His OwnGod Saves through the Means of GraceHuman Beings Are Dependent CreaturesHuman Creatures Fallen into SinAll Things Happen by NecessityHuman Beings Are Totally Responsible AgentsBelievers Live a Life of RepentanceGod Is Not Responsible for Evil5. "Pious Explanations of Necessity": Predestination as Problem in the Wittenberg CircleInitial Treatments of PredestinationThe Topic in Loci communesMarbach versus ZanchiPredestination as Problem in the Wittenberg Late ReformationLeonhardt Palhfer's Rejection of Particular PredestinationNikolaus Selnecker's Rejection of Predestination to DamnationDavid Chytraeus's Rejection of Absolute Necessity6. "God Has Predestined Those Who Cannot Be Lost": The Formulation of the Lutheran Doctrine of PredestinationCyriakus SpangenbergSpangenberg's Biblical CommentariesSpangenberg's Sermons on Predestination of 1567The Reasons for Spangenberg's Preaching on PredestinationThe Hermeneutical Basis of Spangenberg's Preaching on PredestinationSpangenberg's Definition of God's Choosing His ChildrenOpposition to SpangenbergMartin ChemnitzJakob Andreae7. The Formula of ConcordThe Roads toward ConcordThe Formula of Concord on Bound Choice and the Freedom of the WillOn God's Eternal Foreknowledge and ElectionContinuing the Struggle with the Tension between God's Responsibility and Human ResponsibilityConclusion: The Wittenberg Circle's Practice of TheologyResearching ReceptionThe Members of the Wittenberg CircleThe Students of Luther and MelanchthonLuther and MelanchthonReceiving and Handing Down the Reformers' MessageNotesBibliographyIndex of NamesIndex of SubjectsIndex of Scripture References
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