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Apocalyptic Eschatology in the Gospel of Matthew (David C Sim) Hardcover Book, (Cambridge University Press, 1996) 9780521553650
Apocalyptic Eschatology in the Gospel of Matthew (David C Sim) Hardcover Book, (Cambridge University Press, 1996) 9780521553650
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Title: Apocalyptic Eschatology in the Gospel of Matthew

Author: Sim, David C

Publisher: Cambridge University Press; Publication Date: 1996

Hardcover; ISBN: 9780521553650

Volumes: 1; Pages: 300

List Price in Cloth: $137.00 Our price: $137.00

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This study reconstructs the apocalyptic eschatology in Matthew's Gospel so we may understand his time and concerns. Sociological analysis of apocalypticism in Judaism and early Christianity shows that such a world view is adopted by a minority group in a time of great crisis. Matthew's distinctive and often vengeful vision must be set against his community's conflict with Judaism, Gentiles and the larger Christian movement and his acute need to enhance his community's sense of identity and out of pastoral concern.ContentsPart I. Apocalyptic Eschatology and Apocalypticism: 1. The major characteristics of apocalyptic eschatology2. The social setting of apocalypticism and the function of apocalyptic eschatologySummary of Part IPart II. Apocalyptic Eschatology in the Gospel of Matthew: 3. Dualism and determinism in Matthew4. Eschatological woes and the coming of the Son of Man5. The judgement in Matthew6. The fate of the wicked and the fate of the righteous in Matthew7. The imminence of the end in MatthewSummary of Part IIPart III. The Social Setting of the Matthean Community and the Function of Apocalyptic Eschatology in the Gospel of Matthew: 8. The social setting of the Matthean community9. The function of apocalyptic eschatology in the gospel of MatthewSummary of Part IIIConclusionsReviews"To demostrate that MAtthew thoroughly shares the worldview of apocalyptic eschatology (although his work is not an apocalypse), S. usefully identifies eight characteristics common to apocalyptic eschatology in Jewish and Christian texts: dualism, determinism, eschatological woes, the appearance of a savior figure, judgement, fate of the wicked, fate of the righteous, and expectation of the imminent end. The first two help form the conceptual framework of apocalyptic eschatology, and the other six are widely occuring eschatological themes. S. helpfully identifies the repeated occurence of these characteristics in Matthew, drawing many comparisons with other apocalyptic eschatological literature, notably Revelation, teh Qumran literature, and the Enochic literature." Kathleen Weber, The Catholic Biblical Quarterly
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